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By Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler, Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages and of Ethiopian Studies Edward Ullendorff

An advent to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages

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Extra info for An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages: Phonology and Morphology (Porta Linguarum Orientalium)

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For example: qa, open short syllable; qa, open long syllable; qab, closed (and therefore long) syllable. The term "ultra-long" is used of syllables (cf. g. qab). For syllables in final position, ending in two consonants, see next §. 3. According to Brockelmann (GVG, I, p. 63), Semitic originally postulated short vowels in closed syllables. This rule is mainly based on the position in Arabic, and its general application over the Semitic field may be subject to some doubt. Nevertheless, it is a fact that long vowels show a tendency to become short when their syllable closes.

G. 11. g. ) which have already been considered in the section on phonology (cf. 1-22); b) analogy, both morphological and lexical, sometimes in opposition to phonetic laws; an example of morphological analogy (cf. 44-45) is offered by the ProtoSemitic endings of the first and second persons singular in the verbal suffix-conjugation (*-ku, *-ta, *-ti) and their development in Arabic (-tu, -ta, -ti) or Ethiopic (-ku, -ka, -ki), with analogical extension of the elements t and k, respectively; as an example of lexical analogy one might mention Heb.

P'l (I'l) "to make", Cushitic fal; (it should be noted-as indeed appears from these examples-that Cushitic possesses biconsonantal roots with stable vowel). 7. The data just set forth show that biconsonantal roots in the Semitic languages are not a hypothesis relating to a prehistoric period but constitute an historical reality attested by a group of nouns and by a series of verbal forms; this is further supported by the semantic concurrence of many roots in two of their radicals. There is, however, no sufficient reason for main- 74 Morphology The Noun taining, as some have done, that the entire Semitic stock of roots was originally biconsonantal.

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An Introduction to the Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages: Phonology and Morphology (Porta Linguarum Orientalium) by Sabatino Moscati, Wolfram Von Soden, Anton Spitaler, Professor Emeritus of Semitic Languages and of Ethiopian Studies Edward Ullendorff


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